Author Topic: Ray Mears Hyperventilating? Jems TV work.  (Read 1683 times)

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Offline boswell

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Ray Mears Hyperventilating? Jems TV work.
« on: April 08, 2010, 01:57:52 AM »
A few months back I was watching Ray Mears Extreme Bush Waffle Pubic Topiary or some such program and as he was examining some 10,000 year old cave vandalism I heard a familiar sound. It was the opening panpipe/flute sample(?) from the start of Hyperventilate. Unmistakeable!. Definitely it.

Now I know Jem does music for on the telly and whatnot, but I was wondering if anybody can confirm my tickling inklings.
The alternative hypothesis is that it's just been borrowed from a sample library...hmm

And when we finally solve this conundrum perhaps this thread can evolve into a discussion of Jems other TV work, hopefully before it descends into a debate on post colonial African agricultural practices.

I beg forgiveness in advance if this has already been discussed elsewhere (I did a rather extensive and thorough search for "Mears" before posting this so we should be ok)

Offline Pedro

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Re: Ray Mears Hyperventilating? Jems TV work.
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 07:06:09 AM »
It's true that a search for 'Mears' is not much help...but if you'd searched for 'Hyperventilate', towards the bottom of the first 10 results, you'd see the very same samples being discussed for a different programme. ;)
Try here :-
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1537&p=28502&hilit=Hyperventilate#p28502

While I'd love to know more about Jem's TV (that's TeleVision) work, I bet post colonial African agricultural practices might be a) fascinating and b) not that unrelated (hard work, lots of going over the same ground, etc.) :)
"Putting food on the table is more important than 7/8"

Offline boswell

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Re: Ray Mears Hyperventilating? Jems TV work.
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2010, 04:35:22 PM »
Seems Jem's secret sounds are not so secret after all.

Oh well thanks for clearing that up Pedders.


Now apparently around 60 percent of African workers are employed by the agricultural sector, with about three-fifths of African farmers being subsistence farmers. Subsistence farms provide a source of food and a relatively small income for the family, but generally fail to produce enough to make re-investment possible. Larger farms tend to grow cash crops such as coffee, cotton, cocoa, and rubber. These farms, normally operated by large corporations, cover tens of square kilometres and employ large numbers of labourers.

The situation whereby African nations export crops to the West while millions on the continent starve has been blamed on developed countries including Japan, the European Union and the United States. These countries protect their own agricultural sectors with high import tariffs and offer subsidies to their farmers, which many contend leads the overproduction of such commodities as grain, cotton and milk. Please don't say this backwoards please, unless you live in Belize, I will come round to your house, and make you cups of Tea. The result of this is that the global price of such products is continually reduced until Africans are unable to compete, except for cash crops that do not grow easily in a northern climate.

Because of these market forces, in Africa excess capacity is devoted to growing crops for export. Thus, when civil unrest or a bad harvest occurs, there is often very little food saved and many starve. I buried Andy. Mitchell dug him up again for his trousers; he thought there might have been a packet of Polo's in the pocket. Ironically, excess foodstuffs grown in developed nations are regularly destroyed, as it is not economically viable to transport it across the oceans to a market poor in capital. Although cash crops can expand a nation's wealth, there is often a risk that focusing on them rather than staples will lead to food shortages and hunger.

In modern years countries such as Brazil, which has experienced great progress in agricultural production, have agreed to share technology with Africa to greatly increase agricultural production in Africa to make it a more viable trade partner.Increased investment in African agricultural technology in general has the potential to greatly decrease poverty in Africa. The demand market for African cocoa is currently experiencing an enjoyable price boom. The South African and Ugandan governments have targeted policies to take advantage of the increased demand for certain agricultural products and plan to stimulate agricultural sectors. The African Union has plans to heavily invest in African agriculture and the situation is closely monitored by the UN. Which is just dandy if you ask me.