Author Topic: New Yes Album...  (Read 15691 times)

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Offline D S

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2011, 08:18:16 PM »
Quote from: "turbo"
Amazon have it listed for pre order at 22.50    :shock:
I saw that too but I think it was the import version for those who couldn't wait - for some reason, it has different release dates - "Fly From Here will be available in Japan on June 22, in the EU on July 1, and in the US on July 12."

You'll be glad to now that the standard CD is now a more reasonable 10.94 on Amazon and an even more reasonable 8.99 on Play.  Guess which one I ordered?!   ;)
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Offline Geetar

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2011, 08:13:43 AM »
Whatever the price, I'm looking forward to getting it....and then playing: "spot the edit/session player/melodyne interference."

It has the potential, given the personnel involved, to make "Union" look like an honest endeavour.





Oh, yes, I nearly forgot: "Hi, all of you!"
[waves at rog, Pedro, Hippo et al/assembled old lags of this fine and flakey institution. Where're the 'fox and the other rodent, by the way?]

It's good to have the time, leisure and (sadly diminished) brain-power to be back here properly; and. in my old incarnation of unreliable and cranky flagellator of the musically and socially inept.
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Offline rogerg

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2011, 12:40:39 PM »
Quote from: "Geetar"
Oh, yes, I nearly forgot: "Hi, all of you!"
[waves at rog, Pedro, Hippo et al/assembled old lags of this fine and flakey institution. Where're the 'fox and the other rodent, by the way?]

It's good to have the time, leisure and (sadly diminished) brain-power to be back here properly; and. in my old incarnation of unreliable and cranky flagellator of the musically and socially inept.

/waves

'fox has been around a bit, but not since March, and the Mouse is busy finishing up school and spending time in the Fishtank.

we have missed your cranky flagellations!

Offline keithd

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #33 on: June 14, 2011, 08:46:40 AM »
'We Can Fly,' the First Yes Single in 10 Years. I'll let you guys be the judge.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... s-20110613
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Offline Geetar

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2011, 07:30:26 AM »
There are some clearer snippets on Yes' own site on Facebook, here:
Yes


It's, at the very least, interesting. As a Rabin-era fan, I'm inclined to make all kinds of snotty remarks about what does and doesn't constitute Yes, but I won't. I might even quite like it......

Until we get some real Yes, that is :twisted:
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Offline Trapezium Artist

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2011, 08:29:42 AM »
Quote from: "keithd"
'We Can Fly,' the First Yes Single in 10 Years. I'll let you guys be the judge.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... s-20110613

Well, goodness me. Before I grow all cynical and hedge my opinion, let me say quite clearly: I like it. A lot.

Of course, it helps enormously that it's a pretty good studio version of the Drama 1980-era live "We can fly from here", which, as already said earlier in the thread, I've long since thought was superb. This then made it very easy for me to get straight into this new version and made it very enjoyable.

However ... I do find Mr David's singing to be far too pure and unstrained. Belatedly and bizarrely, I've just realised that the occasional roughness in Jon Anderson's voice very much adds to the overall "real" quality. Here things are a little too sweet and smooth for my tastes (and I do hope the vocals haven't been doctored), until, that is, Mr Squire drops in and adds some more grit to the proceedings.

Also, I'm saying that I like a song that's actually more than 30 years old: do Yes still have the writing chops to put together a whole album at the same high level of creativity? I suppose I'll have to buy the album to find out, which, I presume, is precisely why they released this song as the teaser single. Clever chaps ...  8-)

----------------

Hmmm ... addendum. Now I've listened to the Facebook snippets, I tend to agree with someone who commented on the Rolling Stone website, I think: this sounds a lot more like Asia than Yes. Not surprising, perhaps, given that two of the principals are shared, but ... it's not really Yes, is it? (I still like "We can fly from here", but the new bits sound a bit, err, lacking  :( )

Offline Geetar

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2011, 09:13:36 AM »
Quote from: "Trapezium Artist"
do Yes still have the writing chops to put together a whole album at the same high level of creativity?


You're kidding, aren't you? :twisted:

Since they never did in the first place, why would they start now? They are, IMO, the world's most hideously-uneven-yet-still-praised-to-the-heavens band of all time. They get their pass based on chacter, not consistency.

Rabin's tenure was perhaps one of the nearest spasms in their long search for consistency over the course of an album; and I suspect that's one of the principal reasons Troopers hate that period in the band's history. There are plenty of other reasons, sure, but I suspect anything approaching homogeneity is anathematic to the average Hocosaurus Ubiquitus.

Many seem to love them as much for their headlong crashes into the wall just as much as for their glorious musical successes. Drama and The Ladder would be cases in point.
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Offline Trapezium Artist

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #37 on: June 15, 2011, 09:48:48 AM »
Quote from: "Geetar"
Quote from: "Trapezium Artist"
do Yes still have the writing chops to put together a whole album at the same high level of creativity?


You're kidding, aren't you? :twisted:

Since they never did in the first place, why would they start now? They are, IMO, the world's most hideously-uneven-yet-still-praised-to-the-heavens band of all time. They get their pass based on chacter, not consistency.

Rabin's tenure was perhaps one of the nearest spasms in their long search for consistency over the course of an album; and I suspect that's one of the principal reasons Troopers hate that period in the band's history. There are plenty of other reasons, sure, but I suspect anything approaching homogeneity is anathematic to the average Hocosaurus Ubiquitus.

Many seem to love them as much for their headlong crashes into the wall just as much as for their glorious musical successes. Drama and The Ladder would be cases in point.

Nice try, Geetar: that's such a transparent troll that I'm not going to be drawn in  ;)

Except to say that I disagree with (most aspects of) every single paragraph you've written.

Offline Geetar

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #38 on: June 15, 2011, 10:09:50 AM »
No troll intended - merely a statement (and the IMO was the clue here) of my take on a band that I have loved for a very long time. If you've been unable to detect any irony in any of my previous posts on the subject, it's no skin off my rosy nose; anyway, why would even an extreme difference in viewpoint (I don't value the all-over-the-map-ness perhaps anything like as much as you might) be trolling?

No man's -  or woman's - personal view ever enjoys any measure of universal truthiness AFAIK.


And as a passing aside, I never even bother to comment on anything to which I am merely indifferent. I'm quite simple to decode, I am....
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Offline catherine

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #39 on: June 15, 2011, 11:37:46 AM »
The vocals are indeed a bit sugary initially. Bring back Jon Anderson, please.
Guitar's a bit muted - I can't help feeling it should be singing out more exuberantly, and the keyboards are pretty unexceptional. Bass is recognisably Chris Squire. Production's quite classy (as far as I can tell through laptop stream and headphones).

I wouldn't say it was so much Asia-sounding as an X-factor attempt at a Yes...  but I expect I'll buy the album anyway.

Offline Trapezium Artist

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #40 on: June 15, 2011, 12:05:48 PM »
Quote from: "catherine"
The vocals are indeed a bit sugary initially. Bring back Jon Anderson, please.
Guitar's a bit muted - I can't help feeling it should be singing out more exuberantly, and the keyboards are pretty unexceptional. Bass is recognisably Chris Squire. Production's quite classy (as far as I can tell through laptop stream and headphones).

I wouldn't say it was so much Asia-sounding as an X-factor attempt at a Yes...  but I expect I'll buy the album anyway.

The Drama-era live version from 1980 (as found on "The Word Is Live") answers your questions, Catherine: Howe's utterly unmistakable and billion-percent Yes guitar sound is up close and personal, particularly throughout the end section, which has been excised from the radio edit of the new studio version (I certainly hope the full version includes that blazing instrumental section). Squire's dirty-bass-but-treble sound is there in its glory, as are his vocals, and Horn's singing is far less sugary than David's.

If you don't have access to it, just let me know ...  ;)

Offline Geetar

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #41 on: June 20, 2011, 07:34:59 AM »
But just suppose, for a moment..... what if the rest of the album turns out to be better than any of the old shoddy off Drama?


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Offline El_Mayonnaise

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #42 on: June 20, 2011, 01:16:15 PM »
This is like the closest this forum has got to an argument.

They should get Mike Portnoy on drums yeah? Cool!!!2!

I can proudly say I bought the best of Yes (35th anniversary) from a Virgin shop a long time ago. I enjoy some of the songs. Some of the songs are too cheesy or cringeworthy or maybe thats just prog.


Anyway I just wanted to join in.

Good: Roundabout, hunt the whale (hunt it dead), OoALH, Leave it, Survival
Should be good: Heart of the sunrise (those vocals go right through me in a dodgy pork pie way)

Offline Geetar

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #43 on: June 20, 2011, 04:37:08 PM »
I prefer the terms: "robust difference of opinion."

I'd also be delighted to discover that Benoit could be up for a tilt at the title "Napoleon II".
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Offline Mikey

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Re: New Yes Album...
« Reply #44 on: June 20, 2011, 06:51:22 PM »
Quote from: "Geetar"
any of the old shoddy off Drama?

Benjamin Law and the Development of Shoddy

Circa 1813 in Batley, England, Benjamin Law developed a process using recycled woolen rag combined with virgin wool to make a material called shoddy.  Benjamin Law is listed as the developer of this process in several books on the woolen industry in Yorkshire. A Guide to Batley at A Guide To Batley states: "Batley's heritage can be traced back to the start of the Industrial revolution when Benjamin Law, a local man, decided to mix finely shredded rags with virgin wool to produce woven cloth known as "Shoddy", which had a revolutionary effect on the textile industry." The area south west of Leeds had been a major center of woolen cloth production for centuries. Several types of cloth were woven from wool. "Woolens" were heavy felted cloths of the type used for coats and blankets. The cloth trade in England suffered during the the Napoleonic War because of trade embargoes. However, the woolen trade in West Yorkshire remained relatively strong. One of the major problems in the woolen trade in the early 1800's was the lack of sufficient yarn to meet the demands of all the weavers. England did not produce enough wool itself and the war restricted the amounts of importable wool. In the time before the Industrial Revelation much more time and many more people were needed to prepare and spin the yarn than were needed to weave the cloth. Spinning was a time consuming activity. On the other hand the weaving went relatively quickly. The word "spinster" (to denote someone who never married) is a reflection of the need to have people who had virtually no life except spinning in order to provide the family with enough yarn to keep the family clothed. Spinning wheels greatly speeded up this process, but it still required more spinners than weavers. With the advent of carding and spinning machines the process was accelerated to the point that spinning could more than keep up with weaving. The cloth industry grew at a rapid rate after the introduction of carding and spinning machines. The increased demands for cloth created a need for more raw materials and out of this need shoddy was born. Benjamin Law developed a process of turning recycled old rags mixed with some virgin wool into shoddy around 1813. He was unable at the time to figure out a way of incorperating taylors clippings into the process. This was figured out by his nephews several years later and was called "mungo". By 1855, 35,000,000 pounds of rag were being sorted and processed into yarn to make "mungo" and "shoddy". The making of shoddy and mungo is a similar process to the making of woolen and worsted, once the rags had been ground up and processed into yarn. Batley and Dewsbury were the major centers for the rag collecting and sorting business, as well as the manufacturer of shoddy and mungo. Rags were collected from two sources. Old rags from old clothes were collected by ragmen for a price. The ragmen would then sell them to the rag merchant. New rags were bought by the rag merchant as scrap from clothing manufacturers and tailors. Old rags were not as valuable, as they were dirty and needed more processing to turn into yarn. New rag was used for mungo, which was a finer cloth than shoddy. Mungo was developed by Benjamin Law's nephews, who were the sons of his partner, Benjamin Parr, and Parr's wife, Elizabeth Sheard (The sister of Benjamin Law's wife, Lydia Sheard.)  The sorting of the rag was done at the rag merchant's establishment. The work was mostly done by girls and women. The sorting was done in large well-lit rooms over tables with "riddles" (basically a wire mesh to allow the dirt and dust to fall through). Baskets were placed all around the worker, who sorted the rag to the baskets by quality and color. Sorting was skilled labor. Rag sorters had to recognize the difference in quality of the rag in mixed lots both accurately and quickly. A smart rag sorter could sort about one cubic weight of old rags in one hour. New rag took longer, because it required greater care due to its higher value. Only woolen and worsted were used to make shoddy and mungo. Cotton rag was used to make paper. Sir George Head wrote: "The trade or occupation of the late owner, his life and habits, or the filthiness and antiquity of the garment itself, oppose no bar to this wonderful regeneration; whether from the scarecrow or the gibbet, it makes no difference; so that, according to the change of human affairs, it no doubt frequently does happen, without figure of speech or metaphor, that the identical garment to-day exposed to the sun and rain of a Kentish cherry orchard or saturated with tobacco smoke on the back of a beggar in a pothouse, is doomed in its turn to grace the swelling collar, or add dignified proportion to the chest of the dandy". Yorkshire Scenes Lore and Legends, M Tait, 1888 And again from Mr Taits book: "Hither are brought tatters from pediculous Poland, from the Gipsies of Hungary, from the beggars and scarecrows of Germany, from the frowsy peasants of Muscovy; to say nothing of snips and sherds from monks' gowns and lawyers' robes, from postillions' jackets and soldiers' uniforms, from maidens' bodices and noblemens' cloaks" A heterogenous collection truly, to be shredded by "devils" into mungo fibre, re-spun and re-woven, and thus resurrectioned into new material for the backs of people who little dream of the various vicissitudes through which their garments have previously gone." Yorkshire Scenes Lore and Legends, M Tait, 1888 Shoddy has come to mean something made with inferior material. However, the development of shoddy in 1813 was of financial significance in the woolen trade in Yorkshire in the 1800's and later. Batley became the center of shoddy manufacturing in England and was still the center of the shoddy trade as late as World War I.

Shoddy Grinding Mill

John Hewitt in the History and Topography of the Parish of Wakefield and its environs published 1862 gives a description of the Shoddy Grinding Mill as follows: "About the years 1829 and 1830, I recollected a man of the name Pearson, who was a manufacturer of flocks, at East-Moor, Wakefield. He had a grinding machine which was worked by hand labour, and with this machine he ground woolen rags, commonly called "hard woolens" (old cloth garments) into flocks. This grinding mill was very much like the apparatus fixed at the head of a draw well, for the purpose of drawing up water, with the exception that the roller, instead of having a rope attached to it, had many iron-spikes or teeth well sharpened fixed in it; and, in lieu of the well, there was a large wooden box, into which dropped the rags which had been speedily rent or torn into flocks by the iron teeth of the roller, when motion was given to the latter by means of turning round the crank attached to it. Flocks thus ground much resemble wool, the originals fabric of which woolen cloth is made, but being of course the "worse for wear" and in consequence of the pulling to pieces by the mill, are of a much shorter nature, or fibre, than the new wool is; but notwithstanding this drawback, woollen rags disentangled in this manner by mills, similar in principle to the one I have mentioned, have become a famous article of traffic in Dewsbury, Ossett, Daw-Green, Horbury, Wakefield, and a few adjacent places westward from Wakefield. With the admixture of a little new wool, the flocks (called "shoddy") produced by grinding "soft woolens" (old stuff garments, flannels, etc.) have become extensively used at Dewsbury and a few neighboring places, and are manufactured into "new cloth" and other kinds of new woollen goods, suitable to be made into new wearing apparel! Invention and the skill of man are always progressing; and in course of time it was discovered that cloth rags (hard woolens) when properly separated from sewing thread and cotton linings, were much superior than soft woolens in being made up into new cloth, and this caused them to much exceed the latter in price as 3d. and 4d. per stone of 16lbs*, whilst, since their improved value, I have known old cloth rages devoid of seams, and likewise new cloth "clippings" (tailors rags) sold at as much per lb.. There is one fact with regard to woollen rags, which, more than any other is calculated to make a person smile who is unacquainted with their history in this part of the West-Riding. This fact is that woolen rags, especially hard woolens, have frequently in large quantities, used as manure for potatoes, and when the new potatoes were gathered; and, after the latter's going through the process of grinding by the shoddy mill , (laconically, humorously, and justly styled "the Devil"!) they have been re-manufactured into "bran-new cloth". I can vouch for this; for I have seen potatoes manured with woolen rags in Wakefield, and which same rags were afterwards sold at a good price for manufacturing purposes to the shoddy manufactures of Dewsbury!
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